Blog

Pets at a Cookout? Better Keep a Lookout!

Grilling, barbeque or cook-out—whatever you call it, putting food on the grill with friends and family is one of the best parts of summer. But there are risks for your pet, so make sure you keep these safety tips in mind.

  • The National Fire Prevention Association recommends that pets (and kids) be kept at least three feet away from the grill. You should make sure the charcoal fluid is out of their reach as well—it can be toxic if ingested.
  • Cooked meat bones can splinter and become hazardous if swallowed, causing airway or intestinal blockage. Make sure your guests know not to give them to your pets.
  • Corn cobs are a cook-out staple—but don’t give those cobs to the dog! Many dogs don’t shred the cobs when the eat them, and instead, swallow large pieces whole. Complicating matters is the fact that corn cobs don’t show up on X-rays, so a diagnosis often can’t be made until after more specialized (and yes, more expensive) tests confirm the problem. At that point, surgery is the only solution.
  • Got a grease-trapper on your grill? Make sure it is removed promptly after cooking. Many pets find these drippings irresistible and if they consume them, could wind up with severe stomach upset or pancreatitis, which can be a very serious or even deadly condition in some pets.
  • Wood skewers, cooking utensils, and used foil can be considered tasty treats by a dog or cat, but are dangerous if ingested, causing punctures and obstructions in the gastrointestinal system.
  • Booze is a barbeque no-no for pets. Alcohol can dangerously intoxicate your pet and could result in coma or in severe cases, respiratory failure. Yes, this includes beer—fermented hops and ethanol are poisonous to both dogs and cats.

Don’t wait if you think has eaten something dangerous while you’re grilling out! Contact us at (405) 696-4185.

Posted in Blog | Leave a comment

Indiana Bones, Professional Barkeologist

Part I

Chapter One

Indiana Bones twitched his ears for the thousandth time, trying to rid himself of the cloud of flying insects swarming around his head as he used his machete to clear branches and vines in his path. He was on a narrow trail coursing his way through a dense jungle. He hadn’t seen his guide Roger, a mean little Chihuahua with squinty eyes, for the past half hour.

Suddenly he yelped in alarm and jumped back. His last swipe with the machete had revealed a large and vicious face with an open mouth bristling with saber-like teeth. Indiana chuckled at himself when he realized that the face was actually a statue cut out of the local rock. Closer inspection of the statue confirmed Indiana’s suspicion that he was close to his goal—-a pyramid temple complex of the ancient Puptec civilization.

After years of study and research as a Barkeologist (one who studies canine history and prehistory through the excavation of sites and the analysis of artifacts and other physical remains), Indiana was certain that he was close to finding the lost Bark.

The Bark was mentioned frequently in the hieroglyphics found at Puptec excavation sites. Indiana had come to the conclusion that the Bark was the thigh bone of an extinct Wooly Mammoth which had been covered in pure gold and encrusted with precious jewels, and which was imbued with magical powers. He was convinced that the Bark was to be found deep within the main temple pyramid buried in vegetation somewhere ahead.

Roger had been hired as a guide in Mexico City (the ancient capital of the Puptecs) where Indiana was doing intense research. Roger claimed to have secret knowledge of a great treasure of the Puptecs. Indiana contacted his old friend Duke, a Saint Bernard who was a master at flying a float plane, to transport Indiana and Roger deep into Chiapas State on the Yucatan peninsula near its border with Guatemala.

Duke was staying with the plane on the river about five miles back. Roger had become progressively more surly and disrespectful as he and Indiana moved deeper into the jungle, and now Roger had disappeared.

Indiana cautiously moved forward, every hair on his body standing erect due to the sense of danger. He slipped past the statue and soon realized that he was walking on a stone-paved path. As he proceeded, he passed under a stone arch and within 20 yards came to a small hill.

He turned left along the base of the hill and soon came to a corner where he turned to the right. The realization dawned on Indiana that the small hill was actually the pyramid (covered with vines and foliage) for which he’d been searching.

Continuing forward, Indiana soon came to a large opening in the wall. He entered the opening and found himself in a walled tunnel, with hieroglyphic figures covering every surface. Knowing that he must proceed very carefully, Indiana retrieved his field notebook from the pack harnessed over his back and began to decipher the symbols on the wall.

He quickly came to the conclusion that the hieroglyphics were a warning of extreme danger if anyone was to proceed down the tunnel, and within the message were a series of clues to aid a bold traveler. The clues were three in number, and were as follows:

1) A dog who stays and a dog who prays is a good dog.
2) As a bird dances on the breeze must one move over the field of stones.
3) Slow and steady wins the race.

Indiana closed his notebook and replaced it in his pack. He moved slowly into the tunnel, every sense heightened beyond anything he’d ever experienced before. One step, two steps, a pause, another step … Indiana pulled a flashlight out of his pack and snapped it on, revealing a large stone altar in the center of the tunnel about twenty feet ahead.

He took another step … Indiana began playing the first clue over and over in his head, “A dog who stays and a dog who prays is a good dog,” “A dog who stays and a dog who prays is a good dog.” He was now within five feet of the altar and heard a slight whisper above and to his right.

He immediately dropped to a praying position on his knees, placed his head on the floor, and remained still as a stone. He heard a whirring sound over his head and then sharp pings on either side. After what seemed an eternity of silence, he slowly lifted his head and saw a row of arrows embedded in the floor to each side, and additional rows of these arrows embedded in both walls at the level of his body if he’d been standing.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Indiana Bones, Professional Barkeologist

Frozen Felines & Pup-cicles: Winter Safety Tips

Looks like this winter isn’t going to pull any punches—so here are a few suggestions for keeping your animal companions healthy and happy during the icy months to come.

  • Keep fur trimmed. While you don’t want to shave long-haired dogs, you do want to keep the coat and paws trimmed to minimize clinging ice balls, de-icing chemicals, and salt crystals.
  • Dry off after being outside. Remove ice, moisture, salt, and chemicals from your pet with a towel after every walk or outdoor excursion. Try protecting your pet’s paws and pads with a thin coating of petroleum jelly before heading out.
  • Beware antifreeze. Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.
  • Don’t leave pets in cars! Just as vehicles can quickly become ovens in summer, they can also become refrigerators in very cold weather, and pets can freeze to death inside.
 If you have any further questions or need assistance preparing your pet for winter, give us a call at 405-757-2132.
Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Frozen Felines & Pup-cicles: Winter Safety Tips

Meet Sir Edmond Bones

PMCE recently adopted an awesome new dog statue to guard the front of our hospital, and we’ve been inundated with great ideas for what to name him. The choices have been narrowed down to three top contenders:

1. Sir Edmond Bones
2. PMC Pete
3. Indiana Bones

Now we need your help to decide! Go to the PMCE Facebook page and comment on the post there. The person who suggested the winning name gets a $50 hospital credit or gift card, and the runners-up get a $25 credit or gift card!

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Meet Sir Edmond Bones

Holiday Tips

You better watch out! There’s lots of fun to be had during Christmas, but also quite a few hazards for your pet. Here are a few safety tips to keep your pet jolly this season.
Keep chocolate and sweets out of reach. The darker the chocolate, the higher the concentrations of caffeine and theobromine, two substances that are extremely toxic to pets.

Curb the table scraps. Gravy and any fatty meats like turkey skin and ham can be hard for animals to digest and even cause pancreatitis.

Christmas tree cautions. For many cats, the Christmas tree is an endless source of fun…and danger. If you have resident felines, consider tying your tree to a stationary object with fishing line to keep it from tipping.

Mistletoe and other poisons. Nice for getting a kiss, mistletoe is nevertheless dangerous for pets.

The ASPCA Poison Control Line is also handy: 1-888-426-4435 (a fee may apply). They maintain a current list of substances that are hazardous to pets.
Have more questions about preparing your pet for Christmas? Call us at 405-757-2132.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Holiday Tips

National Veterinary Technician’s Week is Oct 15 – 21

At Pet Medical Center of Edmond, we believe that your pet deserves the best in care. That’s why we’re so proud of the veterinary professionals on our staff and want to celebrate them during National Veterinary Technicians Week!

The National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America created this week of recognition, and we’re joining them by highlighting the members of our staff who are Certified or Registered Veterinary Technicians, and two others who are on their way to becoming credentialed. Through their hard and absolutely essential work alongside our veterinarians and office staff, they play a vital role in preserving animal health and welfare.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on National Veterinary Technician’s Week is Oct 15 – 21

From Vet Assistant to Cowgirl

PMC of Edmond had to say goodbye to one our own last month—but we were happy to do it!

Our Veterinary Assistant, Megan, was accepted by the respected Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine this summer and plans to start classes this month. Megan is a passionate advocate for animals and rescues Great Danes and other giant breeds. She’s also a fan of exotics and in addition to four dogs, her family includes a Bearded Dragon and an African Sulcata tortoise.

Congratulations, Megan—we know you’re going to make an outstanding veterinarian!

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on From Vet Assistant to Cowgirl

Watch Dr. Hufnagel perform live surgery at the Oklahoma State Fair

State Fair

If you’re heading to the Oklahoma State Fair on Sunday, September 17th, make sure to drop by the Barnyard Birthing Center where PMC of Edmond’s Dr. Richard Hufnagel will be performing live spays, with an assist from our technicians. Other participating veterinarians will explain the surgical process along the way and answer your questions.

Learn more about the State Fair’s Surgical Suite here. We’ll see you there!

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Watch Dr. Hufnagel perform live surgery at the Oklahoma State Fair

Don’t leave pets in the car when it’s warm!

Our pets struggle to keep cool during the hot summer months, and overheating can cause serious health issues. For example, heat stroke can lead to organ failure or even death if it’s not treated quickly. Don’t ever leave your pet in the car on a warm day! Vehicle interiors heat up incredibly quickly.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Don’t leave pets in the car when it’s warm!

Check that microchip!

Pets are more likely to become lost in the summer since they spend more time outside and in unfamiliar areas. Microchip implants can help reunite lost pets with their owners, so Pet Medical Center of Edmond recommends having your pet microchipped. Not only are microchips effective, they’re permanent, too. You’ll never have to worry about your pet’s microchip falling off, like you do with a collar.

When your pet is brought to a veterinarian or animal shelter or found by animal control, authorities only need to scan the chip to pull up your contact information and let you know that your pet has been found. If your pet is already microchipped, now is a good time to check your pet’s chip and make sure your contact information is up to date.

Pet Medical Center of Edmond believes microchipping is the safest, most effective method of pet identification available, as it helps reunite more than 15,000 lost pets with their owners every month.

You can schedule an appointment to get your pet microchipped online or by calling us at 405-757-2132.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Check that microchip!

Going on vacation this summer?

Is your pet going with you?
No matter where you’ll be this summer, there will be health hazards threatening your pet. Prepare for a fun (and safe!) trip with your pet with these safety tips.

Prevent overheating and burning. It’s hard for our pets to cool off, and overheating can lead to heat stroke and other serious health complications. Always provide your pet with plenty of fresh water, and never leave your pet alone in a car on a warm day. Also, beware hot pavement, as it can burn paws!

Check for ticks. Tick preventive medications significantly lower your pet’s risk of getting the diseases ticks pass along. We recommend Bravecto, as it protects against ticks and fleas effectively for 12 weeks.

Keep tackle boxes locked up. Those shiny lures don’t just attract fish! Every year, we see a few pets that have gotten into fishing tackle and swallowed hooks. Always keep all tackle in cases that can be sealed.

Is your pet staying home?
Your cats and dogs can stay with us while you’re away! Our comfortable boarding facilities are perfect for pets that need a home away from home while you’re resting on vacation.

Please note that all boarding pets must have current vaccines. Read about our requirements here.

Our boarding spaces fill up quickly during busy travel seasons, so make sure to book your pet’s stay as soon as you can by calling Pet Medical Center of Edmond at 405-757-2132.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Going on vacation this summer?

Easter Safety Tips

While they’re sure signs that Easter is on its way, fresh flowers and baskets full of pastel-colored candy also represent potential health risks for your pets! As you’re making your home festive for the holiday, make sure you keep these Easter-related treats and decorations away from your pets.

  • Lilies. Lilies can cause fatal kidney failure when cats ingest any part of them, even just the pollen! Either keep them up high away from nosy paws or keep them out of your house entirely.
  • Chocolate. The darker the chocolate is, the more poisonous it is to your pets, but they shouldn’t have access to any kind of chocolate. So hide those chocolate bunnies!
  • Plastic grass. If your Easter baskets are filled with bright green plastic grass, keep the baskets out of your pets’ sight so they aren’t tempted to chew (and potentially choke) on the fake grass. It looks real to them, but it can cause severe intestinal blockages.
  • Plastic eggs. Don’t forget where you hide your eggs! Pets could choke on shattered bits of plastic eggs or break them open and eat the candy inside.

If your pet ever ingests these substances or any other toxic items, call Pet Medical Center of Edmond at (405) 757-2132.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Easter Safety Tips

Fighting Seasonal Allergies

As many of us know, allergies are no fun. But allergy season doesn’t just affect us—it can affect our pets, too. Grass, dust and other environmental allergens are significantly more present this time of year, and our pets can be allergic to them, too.

If your pet has environmental allergies, your veterinarian may suggest allergy medication. But don’t give your pet any medicine unless you’ve been instructed by your veterinarian to do so. Frequent baths can help remove allergens from your pet’s coat, and wiping his feet before he comes inside can keep him from tracking allergens indoors. You should also vacuum and dust your home regularly to keep it allergen-free.

If you suspect your pet is suffering from seasonal allergies, call Pet Medical Center of Edmond at (405) 757-2132 to schedule an appointment.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Fighting Seasonal Allergies

Find Us on Nextdoor!

Nextdoor is a fantastic social media platform that allows users to communicate with their neighbors about community events, and it allows you to recommend local businesses, too.

Do you use Nextdoor? Check out our business page! We would really appreciate it if you recommended our hospital.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Find Us on Nextdoor!

February is National Pet Dental Health Month

This month is National Pet Dental Health Month, which was started to remind pet owners how important it is to keep our pets’ teeth clean and healthy.

Periodontal disease affects over 80 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats by age three. Not only does it cause pain and smelly breath, bacteria from the mouth can also spread and cause heart, kidney and liver disease. But it’s entirely preventable with dental cleanings and routine brushings at home!

Celebrate National Pet Dental Health Month by scheduling a dental cleaning for your pet at Pet Medical Center of Edmond by calling (405) 757-2132.

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on February is National Pet Dental Health Month

Leave a Comment

Name*

Email* (never published)

Website